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Thursday, December 27, 2012

Hard to believe it is almost January....What are we learning next semester?


That means as far as the school calendar, the year is HALF over! It is amazing how quickly this year is flying by! Looking back at earlier blog pictures & looking at my sweet students now, they have grown so much! They are taller, more experienced, much more confident. I am looking forward to the next semester & all of our journeys together. Parents, in case you are wondering what we will be studying: 


No I do NOT expect you to read all of this! BUT, I want the information available to you, should you be interested. :) 

English/Language Arts/  Reading:


  1. Students will make predictions & inferences.
  2. Blend letter sounds together to decode & spell words in the CVC pattern (consonant, vowel, consonant).
  3. Identify elements of a story (setting, characters, key events) 
  4. Write poems with help.
  5. Learn to identify signs in our community.
  6. Begin to research topics. 
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN??? YOUR FABULOUS KINDERGARTENERS WILL BE READING & WRITING! SOOOO EXCITING!


Math concepts/understandings:

  1. Subitize – the ability to visually recognize a small amount of objects and know how many there are without counting
  2. The last number named identifies all of the objects in the set.
  3. Objects can be counted in any order, and the total number of objects will remain the same.
  4. Numbers describe the quantity of a set.
  5. Number words and numerals are connected and both represent the quantity counted.
  6. As part of a whole is rearranged, the whole does not change.
  7. Numbers are related to each other through a variety of relationships.
  8. Numbers name sets of objects found at home, school, and in the community.
  9. Numbers are in everyday situations and can be represented with words, numerals, and objects.
  10. Words can be used to compare two sets of objects
  11. Number words recited in proper order represent a sequence.
  12. Three-dimensional figure – a solid figure
  13. Two-dimensional figure – a flat figure
  14. Shapes can be seen and observed from different viewpoints in the world around us.
  15. Two-dimensional shapes make up three-dimensional figures.
  16. Words can describe objects and shapes. 
  17. Informal geometric vocabulary can be used to describe the attributes of objects and shapes.
  18. Objects and shapes can be identified, described, compared, and sorted by their attributes.
  19. We will revisit graphing & extend our knowledge further.
  20. Data – information that is collected about people, events, or objects
  21. Real-object graph – a graph where concrete objects are placed in individual cells to represent one piece of data
  22. Addition and subtraction situations occur in everyday situations in a variety of contexts.
  23. When solving a real-life problem, the process includes understanding the problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and looking at the answer to see if it makes sense.
  24. Addition and subtraction problems can be expressed using models and illustrations and solved in a variety of ways.
  25. Real-object graphs are used for sorting and displaying information where each picture or cell represents one piece of data.
  26. Data from everyday situations can be collected, organized, and displayed in a real-object graph.
  27. Data within a real-object graph can be compared visually and numerically.
  28. Information from a real-object graph can be examined to answer questions and expressed using words or numbers.
  29. A number can be composed and decomposed in a variety of ways and justified as each composition represents the same value.
  30. A set of objects can be represented using concrete objects, described verbally and/or symbolically, and compared through a variety of relationships.
  31. Fractional parts of a whole – fair shares or equal parts of a whole
  32. Halves – two equal parts of a whole
  33. Equal – same amount or  same size
  34. A whole can be separated into equal and unequal parts.
  35. Fractional parts of a whole are always made of equal parts.
  36. Equal parts can be separated and reassembled to form the same whole.
  37. Real-life objects, pictures, and words can be used to name the parts of a fractional whole.
  38. Real-life experiences provide opportunities to represent equal parts of a whole object.
  39. Real-object graphs are used for sorting and displaying information, where each picture or cell represents one piece of data. 
  40. Data from everyday situations can be collected, organized, and displayed in a real-object graph.
  41. Data within a real-object graph can be compared visually and numerically.
  42. Information from a real-object graph can be expressed using words or numbers.
  43.  Information from a real-object graph can be examined to answer questions and justify solutions
  44. A calendar is a tool found at school, home, and work that helps people keep track of time.
  45. Time on a calendar is defined by days, weeks, and months.
  46. Dates on a calendar express whether an event is from the past, present, or future.
  47. Length – how long something is from end to end
  48. Area – the amount of surface that is contained within a boundary
  49. Heft – to lift something in order to estimate its weight
  50. Capacity – the maximum amount a container will hold
  51. Duration – the amount of time something takes
  52. Cause – a reason for an action
  53. Effect – a result of an action
  54. The measurement attribute of length is an important link between math, science, art, and social studies.
  55. Measurement occurs in everyday situations.
  56. Length is a measurable attribute of objects.
  57. Common baselines are needed to compare length.
  58. The measurement attribute of length can be observed and justified by lining objects up to examine the differences in distance end to end.
  59. Comparative language is used to communicate results of length.
  60. The measurement attribute of area is an important link between math, science, art, and social studies.
  61. Area is a measurable attribute of shapes and objects.
  62. The measurement attribute of area can be observed and justified by overlaying one figure with another.
  63. Comparative language is used to communicate results of area.
  64. The measurement attribute of capacity is an important link between math, science, art, and social studies.
  65. Measurement occurs in everyday situations.
  66. Capacity is a measureable attribute of objects.
  67. The measurement attributes of capacity can be observed and justified by pouring materials (e.g., sand, rice, water) from one container to another.
  68. Words can describe the maximum amount a container can hold.
  69. Comparative language is used to describe capacity.
  70. Weight/Mass is a measurable attribute of objects.
  71. Heft can be used to determine and justify the heaviness or lightness of an object.
  72. Time is recorded and affects everyday situations.
  73. Time is a measurable attribute of events.
  74. The measurement attribute of time can be observed and justified by the duration of one event from another.
  75. Words can describe how long an event lasts.
  76. Comparative language is used to describe duration of time.
  77. Temperature is recorded and affects everyday situations.
  78. Temperature is a measurable attribute of objects, air, and water (liquids).
  79. Relative temperature can be determined and justified by physical touch.
  80. Words can describe the difference of two objects by touch.
  81. Comparative language is used to communicate results of temperature.
  82. Cause and effect relationships occur in everyday situations.
  83. Cause and effect is an action-reaction relationship.
  84. Words can describe and justify a cause and effect relationship.
  85. Patterns occur in real-life events.
  86. Words can describe and justify the sequence of events or the pattern that occurs because of an event.
  87. Patterns help us see the layout of events and make predictions regarding what comes next.
HOLY COW THAT'S A LOT OF MATH!


WHAT DOES ALL THIS MEAN??? IT

MEANS YOUR LITTLE ONE WILL BE 

COUNTING EVERYTHING IN SIGHT,

MEASURING EVERYTHING, AND DRIVING 

YOU CRAZY SAYING WORDS &

PHRASES THEY HEAR AT SCHOOL. :) 


Science:
  • Day – the time that starts when the Sun comes up and ends when the Sun goes down
  • Night  the time that starts when the Sun goes down and ends when the Sun rises
  • Moon – a natural object that orbits a planet; the Earth’s Moon is its only natural satellite and nearest neighbor in space
  • Sun  a huge ball of gases around which the Earth and other planets of our solar system revolve; the Sun is a star that provides Earth with most of its light and heat energy

Day and night is the result of the rotation of the Earth.

The Earth takes approximately twenty-four hours to complete one rotation.

It is day on the side of Earth that faces the Sun.

We can observe objects in the sky, such as the Moon, Sun, and stars.

The Sun is our nearest star.

Objects in the sky can be described and illustrated.

  • Living organism – to be alive and having basic needs; having the ability to grow, reproduce, and respond to such stimuli as light, heat, and sound
  • Nonliving object – inanimate, not endowed with life; things that are not alive or abiotic substances, such as soil, rocks, or water
  • Basic needs  required for an organism to survive, such as air, water, nutrients, light or food, shelter, etc.



Things can be classified as living organisms and nonliving objects.

Living organisms can be identified by specific characteristics, including basic needs.

Nonliving objects can be identified by properties.

Living organisms have basic needs that must be met in order to survive.

  • Change – to become different from the way it was before
  • Life cycle – the stages of growth and development through which an organism passes during its lifetime
  • Part – a portion of a natural object
  • Resemble – to be like or similar to something else


Plants have parts.

Different parts of plants have functions that help plants survive.
Animals can be identified and sorted by their coverings (exoskeletons, skin, feathers, or scales).

Animals need coverings (exoskeletons, skin, feathers, or scales) to protect them from their environment, as well as from other animals.

Plants and animals have observable characteristics that can be used to compare and sort them into groups.
Some changes happen slowly, while others happen quickly.

Plant life cycles repeat in predictable patterns that can be described and illustrated.

Plants and animals depend on both living and nonliving things in their environment.


WHAT DOES THIS MEAN??? IT MEANS WE 

ARE BREAKING OUT THE BABY CHICKS &

AND WORMS, YES LIVE ONES, & THEY 

YOUR LITTLE SCIENTIST MAY BE

BRING HOME LIVE PLANTS AND FINDS

FROM SCHOOL ADVENTURES. :) 



Social Studies:
  • Community – place where people live, work, and play together; a unified body of individuals with common interests living in a particular area
  • Good Citizen – person who exhibits characteristics of citizenship and/or leadership, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government
  • Patriot – person who loves, supports, and defends his country with devotion
  • Patriotic – actions or feelings inspired by love of country
  • Vote – a choice that counts in a decision-making situation; an expression of preference for a particular person or issue that needs to be resolved or validated. The majority vote always wins.




Events occur in order and relate to each other in time.
Individuals shape communities through their contributions and acts of good citizenship.
People vote as a method for group decision making. 
  • Community – a place where people live, work, and play together; a unified body of individuals will common interests living a particular area.
  • Needs – all humans require three things to survive: food, clothing, and shelter. People need food to eat, clothes to wear, and a house to live in. They work to make a living to buy these things, or they make them. In some cultures people make their own clothes from wool they get from the sheep they raise. Others grow cotton and spin it into cloth for themselves or to sell to businesses, which spin it and make it into clothing. Farmers provide most grain and meat to factories which process it into food for distribution through grocery stores. People can choose to pay rent or buy or build their own houses. These are some ways people meet their basic human needs. Some people experience better standards of living; they eat better food, wear nicer clothes, and live in bigger houses than other people. While people can be happy with less, those who do not meet all three basic needs may not survive.
  • Choice – option; the act of choosing, one of a number of things from which only one can be chosen.

People have basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter.
Human (man made) and physical (natural) features shape our community and affect the way we live.
People have jobs in to meet basic human needs and to provide goods and services for the community.
  • Problem solving – the thought processes involved in solving a problem; method or process of solving a problem
  • Solution – answer to a problem
  • Communities often solve problems by implementing more than one solution. 



WHAT DOES THIS MEAN??? YOUR 

SOCIALLY AWARE LITTLE CITIZEN WILL

BE SAYING PHRASES YOU HAVE NEVER

HEARD THEM SAY BEFORE & ABOVE ALL

ASKING YOU LOTS & LOTS OF

QUESTIONS!!! :) 

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